What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

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JimC
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by JimC » Sun Apr 14, 2024 8:31 pm

The Australian author Greg Egan does dense future science speculative fiction really well. Try "Permutation City" or "Diaspora"...
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Brian Peacock » Sun Apr 14, 2024 11:30 pm

Egan has a new one out atm. Paul J McAuley is also very good. Try "Fairyland" if you haven't already.



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Clinton Huxley » 21 Jun 2012 » 14:10:36 GMT
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by rasetsu » Sat Apr 27, 2024 3:00 pm

Woot! My hold on a library book was finally fulfilled. I want to buy the book, but it's $19, so I'll sample it first.

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I've got the audiobook, but I haven't been listening to audiobooks. I'm greedy. I want fast information!

And my Audible subscription is up for renewal. They're offering the first year for $85. I'm tempted.

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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by rasetsu » Sun May 12, 2024 2:01 pm

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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Joe » Tue May 14, 2024 1:51 am

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"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." - Albert Einstein
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Brian Peacock » Tue May 14, 2024 12:24 pm

What's the conclusion Joe?
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"This is how humanity ends; bickering over the irrelevant."
Clinton Huxley » 21 Jun 2012 » 14:10:36 GMT
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Joe » Tue May 14, 2024 6:50 pm

I'm about a third of the way into it, but Holland's preface has a pretty good summation of what he's on about.
Tom Holland wrote:How was it that a cult inspired by the execution of an obscure criminal in a long-vanquished empire came to exercise such a transformative and enduring influence in the world? To attempt an answer to this question, as I do in this book, is not to write a history of Christianity. Rather than provide a panoramic survey of its evolution, I have sought instead to trace the currents of Christian influence that have spread most widely, and been most enduring into the present day. That is why - although I have written extensively about the Eastern and Orthodox churches elsewhere, and find them themes of immense wonder and fascination - I have chosen not to trace their development beyond antiquity. My ambition is hubristic enough as it is: to explore how we in the West came to be what we are, and to think in the way that we do. The moral and imaginative upheaval that saw Jesus enshrined as a God by the same imperial order that had him tortured to death did not bring an end to the capacity of Christianity for inspiring profound transformation in societies. Quite the opposite. Already, by the time that Anselm died in 1109, Latin Christendom had been set upon a course so distinctive that what today we term ‘the West’ is less its heir than its continuation. Certainly, the dream of a world transformed by a reformation, or an enlightenment, or a revolution is nothing exclusively modern. Rather, it is to dream as medieval visionaries dreamed: to dream in the manner of a Christian.
I'm finding it quite facinating to see how he jumps through the flow of time illustrating this development he's arguing for, and rather enjoy his decidely non-evangelical approach. An athiest writing about Christianity's influence is a nice twist. :{D
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by macdoc » Wed May 15, 2024 9:10 am

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need to find her plane :pop:
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by rasetsu » Wed May 15, 2024 2:27 pm

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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Brian Peacock » Wed May 15, 2024 4:46 pm

Joe wrote:
Tue May 14, 2024 6:50 pm
I'm about a third of the way into it, but Holland's preface has a pretty good summation of what he's on about.
Tom Holland wrote:How was it that a cult inspired by the execution of an obscure criminal in a long-vanquished empire came to exercise such a transformative and enduring influence in the world? To attempt an answer to this question, as I do in this book, is not to write a history of Christianity. Rather than provide a panoramic survey of its evolution, I have sought instead to trace the currents of Christian influence that have spread most widely, and been most enduring into the present day. That is why - although I have written extensively about the Eastern and Orthodox churches elsewhere, and find them themes of immense wonder and fascination - I have chosen not to trace their development beyond antiquity. My ambition is hubristic enough as it is: to explore how we in the West came to be what we are, and to think in the way that we do. The moral and imaginative upheaval that saw Jesus enshrined as a God by the same imperial order that had him tortured to death did not bring an end to the capacity of Christianity for inspiring profound transformation in societies. Quite the opposite. Already, by the time that Anselm died in 1109, Latin Christendom had been set upon a course so distinctive that what today we term ‘the West’ is less its heir than its continuation. Certainly, the dream of a world transformed by a reformation, or an enlightenment, or a revolution is nothing exclusively modern. Rather, it is to dream as medieval visionaries dreamed: to dream in the manner of a Christian.
I'm finding it quite facinating to see how he jumps through the flow of time illustrating this development he's arguing for, and rather enjoy his decidely non-evangelical approach. An athiest writing about Christianity's influence is a nice twist. :{D
No mention of Locke, Hume, Descartes, Rousseau, Kant, or Newton, Leibniz, or Condorcet etc?
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"It isn't necessary to imagine the world ending in fire or ice.
There are two other possibilities: one is paperwork, and the other is nostalgia."

Frank Zappa

"This is how humanity ends; bickering over the irrelevant."
Clinton Huxley » 21 Jun 2012 » 14:10:36 GMT
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by Joe » Wed May 15, 2024 10:17 pm

Brian Peacock wrote:
Wed May 15, 2024 4:46 pm
Joe wrote:
Tue May 14, 2024 6:50 pm
I'm about a third of the way into it, but Holland's preface has a pretty good summation of what he's on about.
Tom Holland wrote:How was it that a cult inspired by the execution of an obscure criminal in a long-vanquished empire came to exercise such a transformative and enduring influence in the world? To attempt an answer to this question, as I do in this book, is not to write a history of Christianity. Rather than provide a panoramic survey of its evolution, I have sought instead to trace the currents of Christian influence that have spread most widely, and been most enduring into the present day. That is why - although I have written extensively about the Eastern and Orthodox churches elsewhere, and find them themes of immense wonder and fascination - I have chosen not to trace their development beyond antiquity. My ambition is hubristic enough as it is: to explore how we in the West came to be what we are, and to think in the way that we do. The moral and imaginative upheaval that saw Jesus enshrined as a God by the same imperial order that had him tortured to death did not bring an end to the capacity of Christianity for inspiring profound transformation in societies. Quite the opposite. Already, by the time that Anselm died in 1109, Latin Christendom had been set upon a course so distinctive that what today we term ‘the West’ is less its heir than its continuation. Certainly, the dream of a world transformed by a reformation, or an enlightenment, or a revolution is nothing exclusively modern. Rather, it is to dream as medieval visionaries dreamed: to dream in the manner of a Christian.
I'm finding it quite facinating to see how he jumps through the flow of time illustrating this development he's arguing for, and rather enjoy his decidely non-evangelical approach. An athiest writing about Christianity's influence is a nice twist. :{D
No mention of Locke, Hume, Descartes, Rousseau, Kant, or Newton, Leibniz, or Condorcet etc?
Well, given that I'm just to the 14th century, no. I did peruse the index and found no mention of any of them and I'm not surprised. The book has been jumping from point in time to point in time, where he digs into a specific episode or development such as attitudes toward charity in the transition of Roman culture as the church became more culturally dominant and the old pantheon of gods declined. It smacks of cherry-picking to me - he actually skipped the life of Jesus - and I have to wonder how much contrary history is in the gaps. I'm too far gone from my Catholic indoctrination to fill in the blanks.

That said, I am enjoying his dives into these episodes. He writes well and the history is entertaining. I'll see how the chapter on the Enlightenment goes without it's great luminaries.
"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." - Albert Einstein
"Wisdom requires a flexible mind." - Dan Carlin
"If you vote for idiots, idiots will run the country." - Dr. Kori Schake

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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by macdoc » Thu May 16, 2024 2:37 am

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Movie was good ...book fleshes out the story in detail...now to find the plane.
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by macdoc » Sat May 18, 2024 5:50 pm

Sigh - nothing concrete on Amelia :(
If they did land on Gardiner Island on the coral flats at low tide then the plane will have been beaten to shreds except for the motors which were not found. A frustrating mystery :dunno:

Back to Malazan Book of the Fallen. About 60% through the 10 linked novels of large proportions. :prof:
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by macdoc » Mon May 20, 2024 2:43 am

Put my toe in - started the omnibus - I see Erikson thinks highly of the author √
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Re: What are you reading now? (Chapter 2)

Post by JimC » Mon May 20, 2024 5:16 am

One of my favourite series, mac...
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